Burda Style Wrap Coat and minky madness

emile

What was I thinking!

I’ve really been enjoying my fleece fabric adventures this year. So I went for the full Monty. During my recent trip to Orlando, I managed a visit to the Sewing Studio Super Store in Maitland. And in the Annex, I found this black minky plush, a real bargain at $4 a yard. Irresistible.

Note on the store: high-end knit and quilting fabrics, ditto the trims and so on, and more built-to-purpose specialized sewing machines than I’ve ever encountered in a fabric store. The Bargain Annex is spotty, and I felt lucky to go home with a piece of fabric.

The store put it in a big bag, and once home, I pulled it out to an absolute flurry of fleece fluff. As a starting point, here’s a pic of my constant companion during this project:

vacuum

I already had a pattern in mind, BurdaStyle 09/2016 #119 – a beautiful design, simple and elegant. I had recently worked on a muslin in sweatshirt fabric, so my confidence level was high.

line art

It’s so nice! I know it’s hard to see the details in black, but please squint a little.

5

6

Things I love: those kimono sleeves, the oversized pockets, and the set-in collar. About the collar. No way would I use this minky for a cut-on shawl collar, one that is an extension of the front, because of the treacherous clips at the shoulder. There shouldn’t be crying in sewing…

1

Sewing notes:

  • This is a challenging fabric because of the fluff stuff from cut edges. All my cut pieces went straight to the serger, and every single edge was serged before I even began sewing. Between my cutting area and the loft, I emptied my little vacuum twice. Even so, the fluff seemed to travel with me everywhere I went in the house! Takes patience…
  • I sewed a straight size 38.
  • Great fit!
  • I didn’t line the pocket, but I did face the top fold to stabilize it.
  • I shortened the length quite a bit. The original CB length is about 44″. I took off 5 1/2″. It just seems more balanced and interesting in the shorter length.
  • Incredibly, the coat has no front or neckline facing. I added both, self fabric without interfacing.
  • My sleeve and coat hems are a little less than 3/4″. I’ve found that a deep hem on fleece doesn’t always work well.

Machine settings:

  • I sewed all my seams with a long stitch (3.2 on my Juki) and topstitched with a 3.4 length.
  • And used a 90/14 ballpoint needle in my sewing machine. Also 90/14 universal needles in my serger.
  • I also decreased my presser foot pressure, from it normal 5 setting, to 2.

I had just enough fabric to make a neck scarf. This is hanging out on my sofa, it’s so warm on my neck.

scarf

I had just come home from the grocery when I took all these pics. It felt wonderful in that cold cold store!

3

Will I ever sew minky again? Sure. It was very messy, but I really like this coat!!

Ciao! Coco

B6251 Cute jacket!

j3

It’s perfect weather for working on jackets and coats.

This was quite a project. This pattern is intended for sweater knits, ponte, and blanket knits. The latter led me to try this in poly sherpa fleece. Interesting…

It’s a nice pattern with unexpected collar options. Views A and B have an attached collar, whereas views C and D have a ‘traditional’ shawl collar (the front extends into the collar).

B6251 line art

Just for giggles, here’s the line art from last year’s B6406 – exactly the same as views B and C on B6251. Go figure.

B6402 line art

Anyway…I did a muslin of this several years ago, view A, the jacket, in a very stable ponte from Girl Charlee.

e1

I found that the center front ended right at my crotch (I hate that word). And that the collar turned very nicely in the ponte. I even did buttonholes!

e3

I tried to use that info on this fleece version, and was partly successful. I added 2″ to the length and also lowered the CF curve by 1.5″. The jacket ends in a nice place in front – but the collar is just too bulky to do a natural fold.

j1

j2

Lemonade! Actually, I love this with the collar up! It’s so warm on the back of my neck.

j4

It’s meant to have a 3-snap closure, but for now they’re on order from Wawak. No way am I attempting buttonholes in fleece. This jacket will live in my car, to be grabbed for that cold cold trip into the grocery. The place that will trigger my Raynoud’s syndrome if I don’t wrap up (pic is from last December, after shopping for Xmas groceries). I asked once – they keep the A/C on 70 degrees.

Raynauds Dec 2016 (2)

Moving on – the ponte coat fail, BurdaStyle 90/2010 #127. I love the design and style, but it is just too big for me, even after I re-drafted it. I think the issue is that I used 4-way stretch ponte. It just keeps growing. It’s not meant for a knit, but I just had to try it 🙂 It’s so pretty.

c2

Parting shot: my Three Kings Day zygo cactus. Our cool weather kicks in a little late for Christmas blooms.

p1

What next? After a rather rocky start to 2018 sewing, I’ll have to think about that a bit. Tempting me – I still have a taxi yellow fleece in my stash. Outrageous, right?!

taxi

Ciao! Coco

 

Pants and jackets…

b1

It’s double-oh early on Cyber Monday! But I think I’ve already contributed all I can to the Black Friday and small business Saturday sales, so I’ll blog to keep myself out of trouble 🙂

I finished my Burda peplum jacket – it was intended as a toile, because I used remnants of a corded denim, but it’s definitely wearable. Great jacket…more details on my first post, here.

b2

line art
Burda Style Collarless Peplum Jacket 11/2016 #125

b3

I’m planning a second version in black ponte, with long sleeves. A stable fabric with a little weight is perfect for this pattern (imagine a brocade – would be stunning).

The jacket is styled with wide leg pants done in ITY knit, a fun abstract print in grey, white, and black.

i3

Feeling brave, I used V9217, a Kathryn Brenne pattern that’s actually intended for woven fabrics (and I’ve sewn 3, first post is here). I love the lines and the flat front on the waistband. And it worked great in ITY!

envelope-horz

I used a straight hem and the slanted pocket from the Pattern Emporium Harem Pants. I use this pocket all the time, because it has a 1-piece pocket bag and doesn’t gape open at the hips.

pocket
Fabric: Monochrome Printed ITY, Fabric Wholesale Direct

i2

Last but not least, I also sewed a new Tessuti Megan Cardigan in grey ponte from Fabric Mart.

m1

lineart

I made a black ponte version back in August, and at the time, I thought it might be a little small. But that was really my mind working on me – I love wearing it.

m3

As with my first version, I raised the hemline by 4″, and used a 1″ wide band (the original band is quite narrow).

m2

This was all fun sewing, and I have outfits!

Bye for now – Coco

Working on a cropped jacket – love this!

1-tile
Collarless Peplum Jacket 11/2016 #125 

I don’t usually open with a photo of an inspiration piece – but this one got me. I found it a few days ago on Burda Style, and fell for it.  I should spend more time cruising Burda Style. I really enjoy their patterns, which are rich in details, trendy, nicely drafted, and really affordable. Since I like to tape paper together, for whatever reason 🙂 their PDF patterns are right up my alley. BTW, the jacket on the left is done in jacquard, the one on the right in ‘shimmered’ jersey (which I now need).

This pattern is only 15 printed pages – the peplum is a rectangle, for which dimensions are given. Check it out! A two-part sleeve, flat-fitted band collar, interesting peplum, darted bodice, and a gorgeous 2-part back yoke

line artThe line art really doesn’t do the pattern justice, but the inspiration photos do. I have been working on a muslin in corded denim, something of which I had remnants, for a couple days.

I loved everything until I got to the fit of the sleeve, which is very gathered in the sleeve cap and somewhat narrow. So I stopped there.

What really worked:

  • First, the bodice and its components fit perfectly. I sewed the size 38, with no changes.
  • The collar is beautiful. It’s not a stand-up mandarin collar. It’s fitted and and lays down perfectly. Isn’t this pretty!? I’m so happy to find this, because collars and standing neck bands typically bug me so much. This one feels great.

collar

  • An unexpected approach to the collar – the inside collar is attached to the facing, and the outside collar is attached to the neckline. A bit of sewing, and one has a perfectly smooth finish at the front edge. No lumps, bumps, or worry about getting the curved seam and facing to meld. I’m going to use this approach every time I can. Kudos to Burda, whose instructions tend to be minimal, but still highlight something like this construction detail.
  • To make life easy and carefree, I made a little template of the collar front along the stitching lines, and I used a Frixion pen transfer them for perfectomundo curved seams…

template

  • Next up – I love love love this back yoke. What a stunning deeply-curved seam…

back

I’ll be using this in tops, cardi’s, jackets, and coats forever.

I sewed the peplum, but didn’t attach it once I decided the sleeve was not for me. Also, the pattern is designed for a lining, but I’m not likely to wear a lined jacket here in Florida. I need flow!

However, bottom line, I really like this pattern, it stimulates my imagination and has so many details that appeal to me. The design can easily be used on the Grainline Tamarack or the Republique du Chiffon Veste Bernadette, both of which I have, for a similar look. My cropped jacket journey is just beginning.

Ciao! Coco

 

 

 

Burda 6770 Wrap pants – the real thing

 

f2

The real thing because they’re not a muslin! I first made these cute pants back in April, using a fabric for which I have no love (here). What I do love is this pattern.

So I transferred all my fitting notes to my pattern pieces, and waited for an opportunity to buy a fun fabric. Earlier this week, with a fistful of coupons, I picked up a couple calico prints at JoAnns. BTW, calico works beautifully on these. It has just the right hand, weight, and drape. And, of course, it loves to be laundered.

I think these Geisha girls are so appealing – and I hope you can see the front wrap on this pic. It’s very subtle, not at all over the top.

w1

One of my pattern adjustments was to the waist. I sewed the size 12, which fits great, but finishes with a 37 1/4″ waist. Ha! These are ‘pull-ups’ and my hips are about 39″. I changed the pattern just enough to finish with a 39 3/4″ waist. And while the waistband is elastic, it sits just below one’s natural waist and isn’t bunchy (the next pic is from my muslin, but it shows the very slight gathering really well).

bum

b1
Top: The Sewing Workshop Trio Shirt (blogged here)

A note on pattern layout and fabric choice:

In general, calico is 44″ wide, and more like 43″ after the selvedge is removed. So I struggled a bit with placement of the two front pieces (and a larger size just wouldn’t have fit). The problem would go away with a 52″ – 60″ wide fabric (such as sateen and rayon, the other two recommended fabrics).

Layout

Great summer pants!

f1

Ciao! Coco