Butterick 5504 linen pants

OK, setting a record, 2 posts in 2 days. But you guys are the best, all the comments, best wishes, and virtual hugs on my last post…right back at you. It really made realize that I’m not the only one trying to redefine my life to things as they are. You’re great.

The pants I mentioned on my post are these, a pattern I love, taken to a full length.

The fit is so nice, even in the back, with the elastic waist. Sewing notes:

  • These are a straight size Medium, with 6″ added for the longer length.
  • The fabric is Robert Kaufman Essex yarn-dyed linen in taupe. Yes, it’s very gold, not taupe at all.
  • I turned the waistband 2″, instead of 1 5/8″, to raise the crotch a tad. I’m 5′ 7.5″, and found I needed this adjustment. A happy change, since my 1 1/4″ non-roll elastic fits perfectly in the casing. BTW, the pattern calls for a drawstring, not elastic, but front-tied drawstrings are not my style 🙂
  • On the inside, I serged all my seams, it makes for such a nice finish on linen.
  • I double-stitch and serge all my crotch seams, woven or knit. If you open the crotch curve as you serge, you’ll get all the flexibility you need in the seam.

Cute pattern! I love the pockets, just a little different and so very easy to sew.

So, a sneak peek at the jacket that goes-with, my next blog post. Ciao! Coco

Butterick 5533 in pink fleece – love

So many variations, I love this pattern. And this early winter I wanted something pink!

The line art:

For this one, I used the body and just let myself go.

Before I go further, this is based on View B neckline, View A yoke, and the basic body of the jacket. More below.

I was after a zip-front with a stand-up collar, mostly because I was using fleece. Kind of a quasi-athletic jacket with lots of ease and so on. And lots of detail and fun stuff.

A challenge? yes, but I did decide that I was willing to sacrifice this fabric if nothing worked 🙂

Sewing notes:

  • As noted, my starting point was Butterick 5533, which I’ve made in many fabrics with a bunch of fun twists.
  • I sewed the View B collar, which is pretty straight forward. The pattern uses the same front and back for either collar selection.
  • The back is loosely based on View A, but I removed a lot of the width and just gathered the skirt fabric under the yoke.
  • The pockets, well, I rounded the bottom edge. Not a big change, but more interesting. I keep a folder of pockets, cowls, bowties, and so on, so this shape was borrowed. I also lined them, as I don’t want to stuff in my hands and distort the fabric – this is fleece!
  • The biggest change: I decided to put in a separating zipper, instead of using a button front. So I drafted a new front with a 5/8 seam allowance at the center front. And I did the same to the front facing. This is an easy change, do not be afraid to do this, on any pattern! I ran the zipper about 1″ into the collar to provide stabilization and continuity to the entire vision I had. This is a #10 30″ zipper from Wawak.
Basting prep for defining the inserted zipper.
  • I used lots of topstitching. Fleece loves topstitching definition, and the additional threads add stability to the lines of the fabric and garment. Here is the beautiful cuff design (on the pattern), with lots of detail.

Thoughts on sewing fleece:

  • I just put this jacket in the dryer for a lint-catching tumble. And I vacumned and dusted my entire house. Everything I wore while making this is in the wash, pink lint everywhere, little tiny pieces, aarrgh. Almost sneezing. Lesson, just relax and go with it, when sewing fleece or fur (I cut out fur outside in my carport!!)
  • Fleece has a lot of mechanical stretch in all directions and on the bias. Here’s how I pinned the seams – but I also staystiched the neckline, front edge, etc., etc., to combat distortion. I used a long stitch and actually increased the upper thread tension to ensure that the stitches and fabric sides had an even tension. The best approach, of course, is to experiment with your fabric, across the bias, horizontal, vertical, on both your sewing machine and your serger. Seems like a lot, but it’s a bespoke and custom garment, right? One of a kind…

I really love this jacket, even though I’m done with pink and fleece 🙂

Ciao, Coco

Butterick 5533 leopard spot fleece jacket

Our temperature dropped into the 50’s Saturday night, which, in Florida, means fleece jacket gratification!

I made this leopard version of B5533 last spring, and I’ve waited until now to wear it 🙂 It’s simply one of my favorite jacket patterns (marigold fleece version here).

Photographs of the details are difficult in this print, but I’ll give it a try.

  • The jacket is a combination of view A (front and collar) and View B (back and pockets).
  • I drafted a front yoke to add topstitching interest and to break up the visual length of the fabric. This is fleece – no way will I try buttonholes in fleece. For closure, I used #4 snaps with buttons on the outside right front.
  • My collar points are rounded, which IMHO adds a softer and more elegant aspect around the face.
  • The view B back is so pretty, I love the deeply curved inset.
Yoke lining in calico

I also made some small fitting adjustments, described in my marigold post.

Love it! Today I’m waiting for house painters to arrive, the next big step for the house. I just had a call from Lowes to advise me that my refrigerator, promised for tomorrow, is delayed until the end of November (mine has a leaky drip pan). That’s OK, I’m so happy here in my new pad.

Ciao! Coco

Butterick 6251 jacket in marigold

play

A little play time – I know I get enthusiastic about things I love, but I adore this jacket!

It happened that I had two pieces of marigold cotton sweatshirt fleece from two different vendors. They are identical, which means I probably have a pair of PJ bottoms in my future, using the remnants.

I’ve made this pattern before in red fleece (here), and it’s a favorite.

B6251 line art

p

 

 

My original inspiration was a pic taken by Shams on her trip with the Tilton sisters to Paris. Stunning. I haven’t made it in a long version, but really really like to do it 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to my jacket! Great sleek vibe, I love wearing it with the collar turned up.

c2

s1

b1

Sewing notes:

  • Sewed View A, which has an attached collar, and I used the changes I made on my first version.
  • Added 2″ to the length.
  • Dropped the front curved edge about 1 3/4″ and trued it back into the curve of the hem.
  • Added 1 1/2″ to the sleeve length.
  • Made curved bottom pockets. This pic shows the prepped pocket – seam allowances clipped at the curve, basted, and ready to be sewn on the jacket.

basted pocket

  • Topstitching detail on the front. Sweatshirt fleece just invites a bit of art.

ef1

  • A tip – clip out the seam allowance at the side hem before turning it. I like to reduce seam bulk at every opportunity!

  • And one more tip. I laundered the fabric twice, and I still had some fleece pills on the inside of the fabric. Nothing a quick de-fuzz couldn’t fix once I was finished sewing:-)

de fuzz

Truth time – this is by far my favorite of my two marigold jackets. I’m thinking navy fleece, perhaps that long version…

Bye for now – Coco

Butterick 6107 Shawl Collar Coat

f1

It’s officially fall in the loft, time for a new jacket and a new pattern!

Butterick 6107 is lovely and interesting to sew. I originally bought it with the standup collar in mind, but I was put off by the way the collar looks when it’s open. No problem – I love shawl collar jackets and coats!

envelope-side

f4

Sewing notes:

  • My choices: size Small, View A, the length of View C, and the pockets from View B.
  • My fabric is Marigold 100% cotton sweatshirt fleece from Fabric Mart. It has only mechanical stretch and is what I would characterize as mid-weight.

fabric

  • The collar is cut-on rather than attached. I know this scares some folks, but the pattern pieces fit perfectly, and the inside corners were easy to sew. Another nice feature: the upper collar is slightly wider than the under collar to allow for the turn of the cloth. A lot of patterns don’t bother to do this.

collar

  • My buttons are 7/8″ faux tortoise shell, with sew-on snaps for the actual closure. I did lots of looking and found beautiful 15mm bronze snaps by Cotowin on Amazon. BTW, Amazon is a great place to look for studs and snaps, the variety is amazing.

e1

closures

e2

  • The patterns calls for lined pockets, but given the weight of my fabric, I drafted mine with an interfaced cut-on facing.
  • Here comes more fun – the back! It’s plain on the pattern, but I split it into 2 pieces just below the armscye. I think the topstitching on the collar, the hem, and this new seam add a lot of interest to the back view.

b1

Oh, this is such a nice jacket, and I love wearing it.

f2

We had a nice Halloween night here in my little community, complete with a pizza party at the clubhouse to get some food into the kids’ tummies ahead of all that candy. Most of my neighbors have left their decorations in place, I think everyone is simply enjoying the season.

Parting shot: I had to do it, Starbucks kicked off it holiday flavors today with free reusable cups 🙂 Did anyone else splurge on a peppermint mocha latte?

cup

Ciao! Coco

Butterick 6423 Coat – a muslin

side

No, I’m not losing my marbles, but I’ll admit this muslin has a bit of personality.

Despite its Easy rating, this lined Lisette coat is a fairly complex design. Tricky bits – the one-piece shawl collar, side/sleeve gusset, and pocket detail. Kick in a lining, and it’s definitely not a beginner project.

 

Note the slight narrowing of the silhouette – it’s real (hence the back pleat), and it does encourage the coat to open below the button, as seen on the model. Since I purchased the pattern to make a jacket, the latter doesn’t bother me.

Sewing notes:

  • I sewed the size Small – great fit.
  • My jacket is unlined, since I would seldom need the warmth of a lining.
  • I shortened the length by 7.5″, to finish at 29.5″ below the base of the neck.
  • Of course the back seam is too low for a jacket profile, so I raised it to finish about 3/4″ below the side/sleeve gusset seam. And I decided to gather the back skirt, rather than use a pleat (pleats that go awry make me nuts).

back bodice and skirt

  • Once I had the jacket constructed, I played with the collar. Without the ‘balance’ of the longer length, the collar is just too wide. I narrowed one side (the arrow side) so I could compare the two. I’m going with the narrowed version.

front collar view

back and collar view

side back and collar view

I know it’s hard to picture this jacket with all the fabric noise – squinting helps 🙂

back

And it’s time to think about a suitable fabric. The pattern suggests wool blends, boiled wool, mohair, wool flannel, and tweeds, and I agree a soft but stable fabric would work best.

Thinking of everyone impacted by severe weather this week, I hope you, your friends, and your loved ones are safe.

Coco

McCalls 6559 Knit Maxi version 2

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Oh, let’s do a happy post! I look so morose in my last one – I had just gotten some bad news re. my heart (has been under watch since last fall), and it showed. I almost deleted the post! but writing on my blog is so good for me (you are wonderful friends). So I left it.

I reached out to my precious children, kept sewing, and today, my pics reflect how I feel now. I’m an optimist, and the only thing on my fridge is something my son told me just after I was diagnosed with scleroderma: Happiness is a decision you make.

Another ITY maxi dress using my modified version of McCalls 6559. This is so much fun, and I simply love how these ITY dresses feel.

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This print is pretty funky. It goes across the horizontal of the fabric, from small flowers to larger ones! And the vertical repeat is something like 30″. I just went with the flow 🙂

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I managed to avoid flowers on the girls, but admit that I kind of have them elsewhere…

Don’t care!

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Just a note on the fabric. When I purchased it, I thought the print was vertical. Which I would love. But it’s not, and placing a pattern across the ‘grain’/stretch of ITY is a recipe for disaster. It would grow vertically and just keep on growing. Now that the dress is done, and I’ve worn it, I’m very happy with this interesting print. It’s perfect for an uncluttered design, something that accentuates it.

I did have to place the front and back down my entire 3 yard piece to keep things copasetic. Which left me half of the yardage in one long piece. So I made a top! using Butterick 6215, the pattern from which I drafted my extended shoulder on the dress.

This top is intended for woven fabrics (as here, three years ago), but I really like the way it works with a knit (I’ve done a couple now, same size as the woven version).

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Pants: Pattern Emporium Harem Pants in ITY knit

Happy sewer here…Bye for now, Coco