Butterick 6423 Coat – a muslin

side

No, I’m not losing my marbles, but I’ll admit this muslin has a bit of personality.

Despite its Easy rating, this lined Lisette coat is a fairly complex design. Tricky bits – the one-piece shawl collar, side/sleeve gusset, and pocket detail. Kick in a lining, and it’s definitely not a beginner project.

 

Note the slight narrowing of the silhouette – it’s real (hence the back pleat), and it does encourage the coat to open below the button, as seen on the model. Since I purchased the pattern to make a jacket, the latter doesn’t bother me.

Sewing notes:

  • I sewed the size Small – great fit.
  • My jacket is unlined, since I would seldom need the warmth of a lining.
  • I shortened the length by 7.5″, to finish at 29.5″ below the base of the neck.
  • Of course the back seam is too low for a jacket profile, so I raised it to finish about 3/4″ below the side/sleeve gusset seam. And I decided to gather the back skirt, rather than use a pleat (pleats that go awry make me nuts).

back bodice and skirt

  • Once I had the jacket constructed, I played with the collar. Without the ‘balance’ of the longer length, the collar is just too wide. I narrowed one side (the arrow side) so I could compare the two. I’m going with the narrowed version.

front collar view

back and collar view

side back and collar view

I know it’s hard to picture this jacket with all the fabric noise – squinting helps 🙂

back

And it’s time to think about a suitable fabric. The pattern suggests wool blends, boiled wool, mohair, wool flannel, and tweeds, and I agree a soft but stable fabric would work best.

Thinking of everyone impacted by severe weather this week, I hope you, your friends, and your loved ones are safe.

Coco

McCalls 6559 Knit Maxi version 2

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Oh, let’s do a happy post! I look so morose in my last one – I had just gotten some bad news re. my heart (has been under watch since last fall), and it showed. I almost deleted the post! but writing on my blog is so good for me (you are wonderful friends). So I left it.

I reached out to my precious children, kept sewing, and today, my pics reflect how I feel now. I’m an optimist, and the only thing on my fridge is something my son told me just after I was diagnosed with scleroderma: Happiness is a decision you make.

Another ITY maxi dress using my modified version of McCalls 6559. This is so much fun, and I simply love how these ITY dresses feel.

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This print is pretty funky. It goes across the horizontal of the fabric, from small flowers to larger ones! And the vertical repeat is something like 30″. I just went with the flow 🙂

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I managed to avoid flowers on the girls, but admit that I kind of have them elsewhere…

Don’t care!

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Just a note on the fabric. When I purchased it, I thought the print was vertical. Which I would love. But it’s not, and placing a pattern across the ‘grain’/stretch of ITY is a recipe for disaster. It would grow vertically and just keep on growing. Now that the dress is done, and I’ve worn it, I’m very happy with this interesting print. It’s perfect for an uncluttered design, something that accentuates it.

I did have to place the front and back down my entire 3 yard piece to keep things copasetic. Which left me half of the yardage in one long piece. So I made a top! using Butterick 6215, the pattern from which I drafted my extended shoulder on the dress.

This top is intended for woven fabrics (as here, three years ago), but I really like the way it works with a knit (I’ve done a couple now, same size as the woven version).

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Pants: Pattern Emporium Harem Pants in ITY knit

Happy sewer here…Bye for now, Coco

Butterick 5504 Capris and shorts

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Revisiting a pattern I sewed way back in 2012, the year I started this blog! I had forgotten the nice lines and spectacular pockets of these pants.

5504-side

My 2012 version was View B, the capris, done in lightweight stretch denim, and I really enjoyed wearing them. So I ordered a similar denim from Fabric Mart. However, the fabric was such a disappointment. It’s heavy, stiff, and very stretchy, quite a bit more than the 20% in its description. Multiple washings didn’t help, and I really couldn’t think of any way to use it successfully.

Having decided that, I was happy to play with it. I started with the capri length and then took off 14″ to see the shorts 🙂

capris

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Top: New Look 6150 in grunge burnout jersey

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Just a few sewing notes:

  • This is a Connie Crawford pattern, and it’s described as ‘modern fit’. I’m not sure what that implies, but I like it. In the envelope drawings, the pants look wider at the bottom, almost like sailor pants, but they actually have a straight leg, as in the line art.
  • I sewed the size Medium.
  • Rather than use a drawstring in the waist, I added 2” to the waist band and used 2” elastic. I think 2″ is a little too much and plan to use 1.5″ elastic on my next pair.
  • And I used broadcloth for the pocket facing to reduce weight. Those pockets – such a nice detail.

emile

Odds and ends:

I finally found the pin in the sewing room carpet that’s gotten me (painfully) several times. Wicked – it’s a 2″ quilters pin.

pin

And I did a muslin of the Grainline Studio Alder dress, View A. I had to reprint the PDF and draft new tissue in size 10, but it was worth the effort. I love the lines and fit, it just needs a nice summer fabric and a little shorter length.

view A

 

I’m not fond of pointed collars, so I tried a curved one. Very cute!

Alder collar

In addition to playing with patterns, I’ve been very busy online, cruising the spring and summer collections. I always try searching on Pinterest, but it insists on feeding me shredded blue jeans, skimpy tops, bras, and makeup tips for older women. So weird.

Bye for now! Coco

My long hoodie muslin

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My current project, keeping me out of trouble…a muslin of a long hoodie. This has been fun!

Please excuse any blurry photos. My laptop is acting up, it’s old, on Windows 7 because it cannot handle Windows 10. In fact I’ve ordered a Mac Air 2 to replace it. OK. Yes, I’m excited and broke at the same time 🙂

So – I’m so intrigued by the long hoodies I see on Pinterest. Kind of up my alley. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I order M7634 for a starting point for drafting a long hoodie ( I’m only showing the line art for the long top here, but it has fantastic knit pants as well):

line art 1

And check it out!

b1

This is a very modified draft. M7634 is a top and/or dress, very slim through the torso and sleeves. So I drafted my tissue using the B6251 jacket pattern as the basis for my upper bodice, shoulders, sleeves, and side seams. What was left? well, that wonderful hood and the hemline bands.

hood up

Honestly, I love messing with patterns. Although admittedly, not all of my mash-ups turn out as well as this one.

Originally, I thought I would add a button band (not wanting to put a zipper in a knit fabric):

my line art

And I did it, using a couple fleece blankets from the drug store, $6 investment. Confession time, I mistakenly cut the whole thing on the cross-grain, which left no stretch horizontally, and the entire thing was too tight. Oh well 🙂

This muslin is also done in fleece blankets from the store, but I changed the front edge. I simply added a cut-on facing to match the width of the fold on the hood. It gives really nice continuity to the flow from the hood down the front. If I were to use snaps or a zipper, I would cut the band separately to allow for interfacing (this version has none) and/or a seam to enclose the zipper tape.

Sewing notes:

  • I like the idea of the hem bands, but wanted mine to curve in just a little. So I simply took 3/8″ out of each band and stretched it to fit.
  • I didn’t add sleeve cuffs – my wrists are so sensitive (scleroderma has shrunken them from 7″ to 6″), so I went for a simple hemmed sleeve.
  • I’ve always been a little intimidated by that seam, hood to neckline, wondering how to finish it without raw edges. Following a nice tutorial on Craftsy, I finished mine with twill tape. Not purple tape, mine is black, what I had hanging around – but remember, this is a muslin. The twill tape is a nice and really easy technique.

twill

twill 2

  • As always I looked online for other versions of m7634. What I noticed most was that the shoulders and hood neckline were loosey-goosey. Stretched out, and just not something I would wear. I tamed the tiger by using tricot knit fusible in the shoulders, and, of course, that twill tape in the neckline/hood seam.

 

b2

 

Now I have a great pattern draft, makes me dangerous. I really want to make a long hoodie in sweatshirt fabric. Classic grey?

Ciao! Coco

B5533 Microfleece jacket…

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Long time no see! I’ve been visiting family and  doing a lot of sewing. A couple nice keepers and one miserable failure (future posts).

Here’s a recently sewn jacket, a variation of a favorite pattern from Butterick. It’s done in ‘Taxi Yellow’ microfleece from Fabric Mart, and it kept me warm through 5 cold days in Orlando last week. Nice!

B5533 line art

I first made this pattern 4 years, with a lined hood taken from a cape pattern, B5807. It fit perfectly on the View A neckline! It was also fleece, but was a very lightweight and stable variety from JoAnns. My new jacket is mid-weight fleece and has a lot more stretch.

Original

This time, I used View A for the front,

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and View B for the back.

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So far I haven’t put on the pockets, but I think I will, since I keep reaching for them. Mine have rounded corners at the bottom, pretty cute.

Something else I rounded was the point on the collar. I just didn’t want to struggle with the point and end up  with a rounded collar anyway because of the bulky fabric!

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I generally avoid the angst of sewing buttonholes in fleece, so I used four snaps (size 4) for closure – with buttons sewn in place on the outside. Works great.

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I just love the back detail and two-piece sleeves.

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Sewing notes:

  • Size 12.
  • To break up the front a bit, I cut it with a yoke.

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  • I used 3/8″ topstitching throughout.
  • There was lots of staystitching and basting during the construction! Although the fleece has no vertical stretch, it has 80% stretch across the width. Had to tame that beast…
  • The sleeves on the pattern are short – I added 1″.
  • Fusible interfacing doesn’t work on fleece, so I used sewn-in broadcloth interfacing on the collar and front facing.
  • I raised the armscye by 1/2″ at the shoulder to compensate for the stretch in the material.
  • And I flattened the sleeve head quite a bit to fit the armscye with no gathers.
  • For a little Jungle January fun, I faced the back yoke with an animal print. It also serves as a facing for the back neckline.

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It’s almost 7 p.m, time for the Australian Tennis Open! Bye for now – Coco