Butterick 6251 jacket in marigold

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A little play time – I know I get enthusiastic about things I love, but I adore this jacket!

It happened that I had two pieces of marigold cotton sweatshirt fleece from two different vendors. They are identical, which means I probably have a pair of PJ bottoms in my future, using the remnants.

I’ve made this pattern before in red fleece (here), and it’s a favorite.

B6251 line art

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My original inspiration was a pic taken by Shams on her trip with the Tilton sisters to Paris. Stunning. I haven’t made it in a long version, but really really like to do it 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to my jacket! Great sleek vibe, I love wearing it with the collar turned up.

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Sewing notes:

  • Sewed View A, which has an attached collar, and I used the changes I made on my first version.
  • Added 2″ to the length.
  • Dropped the front curved edge about 1 3/4″ and trued it back into the curve of the hem.
  • Added 1 1/2″ to the sleeve length.
  • Made curved bottom pockets. This pic shows the prepped pocket – seam allowances clipped at the curve, basted, and ready to be sewn on the jacket.

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  • Topstitching detail on the front. Sweatshirt fleece just invites a bit of art.

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  • A tip – clip out the seam allowance at the side hem before turning it. I like to reduce seam bulk at every opportunity!
  • And one more tip. I laundered the fabric twice, and I still had some fleece pills on the inside of the fabric. Nothing a quick de-fuzz couldn’t fix once I was finished sewing:-)

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Truth time – this is by far my favorite of my two marigold jackets. I’m thinking navy fleece, perhaps that long version…

Bye for now – Coco

Butterick 6107 Shawl Collar Coat

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It’s officially fall in the loft, time for a new jacket and a new pattern!

Butterick 6107 is lovely and interesting to sew. I originally bought it with the standup collar in mind, but I was put off by the way the collar looks when it’s open. No problem – I love shawl collar jackets and coats!

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Sewing notes:

  • My choices: size Small, View A, the length of View C, and the pockets from View B.
  • My fabric is Marigold 100% cotton sweatshirt fleece from Fabric Mart. It has only mechanical stretch and is what I would characterize as mid-weight.

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  • The collar is cut-on rather than attached. I know this scares some folks, but the pattern pieces fit perfectly, and the inside corners were easy to sew. Another nice feature: the upper collar is slightly wider than the under collar to allow for the turn of the cloth. A lot of patterns don’t bother to do this.

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  • My buttons are 7/8″ faux tortoise shell, with sew-on snaps for the actual closure. I did lots of looking and found beautiful 15mm bronze snaps by Cotowin on Amazon. BTW, Amazon is a great place to look for studs and snaps, the variety is amazing.

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closures

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  • The patterns calls for lined pockets, but given the weight of my fabric, I drafted mine with an interfaced cut-on facing.
  • Here comes more fun – the back! It’s plain on the pattern, but I split it into 2 pieces just below the armscye. I think the topstitching on the collar, the hem, and this new seam add a lot of interest to the back view.

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Oh, this is such a nice jacket, and I love wearing it.

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We had a nice Halloween night here in my little community, complete with a pizza party at the clubhouse to get some food into the kids’ tummies ahead of all that candy. Most of my neighbors have left their decorations in place, I think everyone is simply enjoying the season.

Parting shot: I had to do it, Starbucks kicked off it holiday flavors today with free reusable cups 🙂 Did anyone else splurge on a peppermint mocha latte?

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Ciao! Coco

Kwik Sew 4015 Reversible Fall Jacket

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What an interesting project, and, yes, a bit of a departure from my usual style.

My inspiration was a pic I found on Pinterest. The colors, prints, and silhouette are so appealing and just say ‘autumn’. Trolling my pattern stash, I found Kwik Sew 4015, which I last used to make Ashley a Kaylee Firefly jacket (here). And I found the perfect fabrics on Marshall Dry Goods, Country Floral cottons.

This pattern has so many options: pre-quilted fabric with bound edges, in-seam pockets, and a mandarin collar (View A), and a reversible jacket with a dropped back hem, patch pockets, and a hood (View B). Between the two, I had every element I needed for my jacket.

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Sewing notes:

  • I cut out the pattern in both my fabrics, all pieces, in size Medium. And I cut yards and yards of bias binding from a plum-colored quilting cotton.
  • The jacket is somewhat fitted, so I redrew the side seams with a slight A-line.
  • I also dropped the front hem to be even with the back, and took out the side curve detail. With a 3/8″addition to the length, my jacket is 28″ long at the center back.
  • Once my shell was sewn, with the hood finished and basted into the neckline, I created a pieced pocket. The idea was to have the pockets and the sleeves echo one another.

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  • The next step was to sew the contrast and attach it at the neckline. Followed by careful pressing, addition of the binding, and, ta da – a reversible jacket!

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  • I’ve only attached buttons on the main fabric side, but one could add them to the contrast side and/or add pockets as well.

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Cute, right? And incredibly comfortable and lightweight.

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I enjoyed making this so much that I’m thinking of doing another one 🙂

Ciao! Coco

Fall jacket inspiration

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I love this jacket I found on Pinterest (sorry, no source). And I had to go looking for a pattern in my stash. Enter Kwik Sew 4015:

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A little tweaking required for the silhouette and front hemline, but it will work!

Fabrics – I looked on Marshall Dry Goods, king of inexpensive quilting cottons. The combo I purchased is from the ‘Country Floral‘ collection. I love the color and print for fall.

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These fabrics are only $3.99/yard, 100% cotton, 45″ width. Amazing. And they’re on their way – MDG has very fast shipping and reasonable shipping costs.

I’m pretty jazzed about this project! Bye for now – Coco

Lekala 5712 Faux Fur Jacket

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This has been a really fun and time-consuming journey! A faux fur jacket…Screen Shot 2018-09-16 at 1.44.32 PM

First step: I purchased several yards of walnut sherpa knit from Fabric Mart. Then I had to do some research: Sherpa is the term for faux shearling, and the foundation is the Sherpa region of Nepal. I felt really brave ordering this fabric, but it’s wonderful. It’s polyester (as are many faux furs), and it has a full tuft on a pretty jersey knit backing.

Then I spent at least a couple days just browsing fur and jacket patterns. There are so many examples of the ‘teddy bear’ coats online, as well as sherpa coats, but I wanted a short jacket, something I can throw on to go to the grocery. I’m so cold in stores!

Finally, I came upon this pattern by Lekala. It was unexpected, as I’ve never sewn a Lekala pattern, but this one is designed for faux fur. An interesting feature, Lekala patterns are based on customized sizing. I decided to go for it!

lekala 5712

We need another pic here…

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Sewing notes:

  • I submitted my sizing as: 34 bust, 32 underbust, 30 waist, 38 high hip, 39 full hip. Normal shoulder, sleeve, etc. The pattern was $2.99, and for $.50 more I got 5/8″ seam allowances and 1 3/4″ hem allowances.
  • I love how dense the pattern is on the PDF! I get really frustrated by PDFs that have 1″ margins (Grainline, I’m talking to you) and just waste my paper and make me crazy with tape and scissors. This one does not.
  • The pattern has a 2-piece bodice, front and back, to allow for the bust. Actually, I didn’t want and don’t need this, so I flattened my pattern pieces to have a 1-piece front and back.
  • I wasn’t sure of the lengths of the arms and jacket, so I added 2″ to both. Absolutely not needed, and I ended up trimming this extra allowance off both.
  • The pattern includes instructions for cutting and sewing a lining, which I didn’t use.

The construction is straight-forward. Shoulder, collar, facing, sleeves, side seams, and hems

  • I love the collar and cut-on facing. Everything fits beautifully to the jacket.

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  • As I wasn’t using a lining, I drafted a back neckline facing.

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More pics…

 

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I love this! Ciao! Coco