Maxi sweatshirt hoodie!

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At last, it’s cool enough to actually wear this hoodie that I made in the spring! It’s 60 degrees, and I’m off to JoAnn with a fistful of coupons.

This adorable polka dot cotton/poly sweatshirt fabric showed up on FabricMart last March, and I snatched it up. I made the jacket in May, and I’ve resisted the temptation to post it until now.

My inspiration was something I found on Pinterest – apology, I didn’t keep the shop name.

inspiration

I sewed a couple muslins with pieces of various patterns, and I settled on a combo of the Vogue 9275 jacket and the hood from McCall 7634.

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Vogue 9275
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McCall 7634

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Sewing notes:

  • I sewed size Medium in the jacket.
  • The hood from M7634 size 12 fits perfectly.

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  • While the Vogue jacket is fairly long, I added 2” to length.
  • I drafted front and back neckline facings so the inside of fabric would not show when I don’t zip it (picky).
  • And I drafted a cute pocket, 9″h x 8″w, as I’m not a fan of kangaroo pockets.
  • My zipper is a #5 plastic jacket zipper from Wawak .

zipper in

  • Also from Wawak, a zipper pull!

zipper

  • Not sure of the length I needed, I ordered a 36″ zipper and shortened it to fit. These are my jewelry tools, perfect for removing zipper teeth!

zipper 2

  • At the bottom, I added a 2″ wide band that pretty much echoes the cuff. The width of the band is only slightly less than the width of the hem, to give it the sweatshirt vibe.

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So so cute! I loved wearing it today. f1

Bye for now! Coco

Simplicity 2703 jacket muslin in ponte

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Yes, I make a lot of muslins, but I don’t always write about them. Having a 1 3/4 yard ponte remnant, I decided to do a little pattern play with S2703.

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It’s an ‘old’ pattern that I picked up to make a replacement for my worn-out RTW (either JJill or Coldwater Creek) jacket.

The pattern suggests a variety of woven fabrics, so of course I want to make it in a knit 🙂

Sewing notes:

  • I sewed the size 10, with 4″ added to the length. The original pattern is very short!

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  • Given all the other curve and cutesy details, I squared my front bottom edges.

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  • The sleeves are bracelet length, not my favorite, so I added 4″ to them as well.

cuff finish

  • Not wanting the jacket to be too fitted in the torso, I added 5/8″ to the front and back side seams at the waistline, and re-drew the them accordingly.
  • Weird thing: the pattern has a lined upper and lower front and a full yoke-sized lining at the upper back. This would be much too much fabric in ponte. So I drafted 3″ wide facing for the back neckline and front edges.

back facing

  • The collar on this jacket is wonderful!! It’s cut in one piece, no worry or fuss with the front curves. To keep it soft and flexible, I did not interface it.

front facing

  • What didn’t work – the front waist band. I should have lined it in a woven fabric to prevent stretching.

front band

I won’t keep this muslin, but I definitely have plans for the pattern – I would love this in a very lightweight white French terry for summer.

Parting shot: This orchid has been growing in my guava tree since I bought it as a little dried out thingie in a net bag, eight years ago. It’s blooming for the first time! and I think it might be a cattleya.

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Ciao! Coco

Butterick 6251 jacket in marigold

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A little play time – I know I get enthusiastic about things I love, but I adore this jacket!

It happened that I had two pieces of marigold cotton sweatshirt fleece from two different vendors. They are identical, which means I probably have a pair of PJ bottoms in my future, using the remnants.

I’ve made this pattern before in red fleece (here), and it’s a favorite.

B6251 line art

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My original inspiration was a pic taken by Shams on her trip with the Tilton sisters to Paris. Stunning. I haven’t made it in a long version, but really really like to do it 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to my jacket! Great sleek vibe, I love wearing it with the collar turned up.

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Sewing notes:

  • Sewed View A, which has an attached collar, and I used the changes I made on my first version.
  • Added 2″ to the length.
  • Dropped the front curved edge about 1 3/4″ and trued it back into the curve of the hem.
  • Added 1 1/2″ to the sleeve length.
  • Made curved bottom pockets. This pic shows the prepped pocket – seam allowances clipped at the curve, basted, and ready to be sewn on the jacket.

basted pocket

  • Topstitching detail on the front. Sweatshirt fleece just invites a bit of art.

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  • A tip – clip out the seam allowance at the side hem before turning it. I like to reduce seam bulk at every opportunity!
  • And one more tip. I laundered the fabric twice, and I still had some fleece pills on the inside of the fabric. Nothing a quick de-fuzz couldn’t fix once I was finished sewing:-)

de fuzz

Truth time – this is by far my favorite of my two marigold jackets. I’m thinking navy fleece, perhaps that long version…

Bye for now – Coco

Butterick 6107 Shawl Collar Coat

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It’s officially fall in the loft, time for a new jacket and a new pattern!

Butterick 6107 is lovely and interesting to sew. I originally bought it with the standup collar in mind, but I was put off by the way the collar looks when it’s open. No problem – I love shawl collar jackets and coats!

envelope-side

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Sewing notes:

  • My choices: size Small, View A, the length of View C, and the pockets from View B.
  • My fabric is Marigold 100% cotton sweatshirt fleece from Fabric Mart. It has only mechanical stretch and is what I would characterize as mid-weight.

fabric

  • The collar is cut-on rather than attached. I know this scares some folks, but the pattern pieces fit perfectly, and the inside corners were easy to sew. Another nice feature: the upper collar is slightly wider than the under collar to allow for the turn of the cloth. A lot of patterns don’t bother to do this.

collar

  • My buttons are 7/8″ faux tortoise shell, with sew-on snaps for the actual closure. I did lots of looking and found beautiful 15mm bronze snaps by Cotowin on Amazon. BTW, Amazon is a great place to look for studs and snaps, the variety is amazing.

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closures

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  • The patterns calls for lined pockets, but given the weight of my fabric, I drafted mine with an interfaced cut-on facing.
  • Here comes more fun – the back! It’s plain on the pattern, but I split it into 2 pieces just below the armscye. I think the topstitching on the collar, the hem, and this new seam add a lot of interest to the back view.

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Oh, this is such a nice jacket, and I love wearing it.

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We had a nice Halloween night here in my little community, complete with a pizza party at the clubhouse to get some food into the kids’ tummies ahead of all that candy. Most of my neighbors have left their decorations in place, I think everyone is simply enjoying the season.

Parting shot: I had to do it, Starbucks kicked off it holiday flavors today with free reusable cups 🙂 Did anyone else splurge on a peppermint mocha latte?

cup

Ciao! Coco

Kwik Sew 4015 Reversible Fall Jacket

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What an interesting project, and, yes, a bit of a departure from my usual style.

My inspiration was a pic I found on Pinterest. The colors, prints, and silhouette are so appealing and just say ‘autumn’. Trolling my pattern stash, I found Kwik Sew 4015, which I last used to make Ashley a Kaylee Firefly jacket (here). And I found the perfect fabrics on Marshall Dry Goods, Country Floral cottons.

This pattern has so many options: pre-quilted fabric with bound edges, in-seam pockets, and a mandarin collar (View A), and a reversible jacket with a dropped back hem, patch pockets, and a hood (View B). Between the two, I had every element I needed for my jacket.

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Sewing notes:

  • I cut out the pattern in both my fabrics, all pieces, in size Medium. And I cut yards and yards of bias binding from a plum-colored quilting cotton.
  • The jacket is somewhat fitted, so I redrew the side seams with a slight A-line.
  • I also dropped the front hem to be even with the back, and took out the side curve detail. With a 3/8″addition to the length, my jacket is 28″ long at the center back.
  • Once my shell was sewn, with the hood finished and basted into the neckline, I created a pieced pocket. The idea was to have the pockets and the sleeves echo one another.

pkt

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  • The next step was to sew the contrast and attach it at the neckline. Followed by careful pressing, addition of the binding, and, ta da – a reversible jacket!

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  • I’ve only attached buttons on the main fabric side, but one could add them to the contrast side and/or add pockets as well.

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Cute, right? And incredibly comfortable and lightweight.

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I enjoyed making this so much that I’m thinking of doing another one 🙂

Ciao! Coco