MC2 Harem pants playtime

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That look on my face…I love the MC2 sarouel Afghan harem pants!

I’ve made four to date, 2 for me (earlier post here), 2 for Ashley. And I plan to make more. NOTHING in my closet is more comfortable or more fun than these britches.

This is a great pattern I found this year (here):

pattern

More pics!

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My fabric is a cotton/poly French terry from FabricMart. I love it! It’s lightweight and feels great. I checked, it’s not available at the moment, but their inventory changes so quickly – I check them out every morning…

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Cute! and here’s a pic with my self-drafted sharkbite hem knit topper:

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I wore this on my evening walk a couple days ago, and a gal and her dog stopped and simply said, ‘that outfit’. That felt good!

Ciao! Coco

Monday muslin V8499 pants

V8499

Sometimes I just want to take another look at a pattern. I first made the V8499 pants when I was much heavier, and I was trying Lagenlook styles. Thinking about it over the weekend, and having a couple yards of available Brussels washer linen, I decided to try a smaller size. So a Monday muslin πŸ™‚

First version:

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Honestly, I don’t care for this style at the moment. But these pants are not wasted – they’ll be reworked as a straight leg pant. I would really like them in a corduroy for our brief winter. And those pockets are simply too good to ignore.

Undeterred, I’m about to cut out a True Bias Yari jumpsuit in Kaufman Essex linen, yard-dyed denim. I’ve enjoyed my espresso version so much.

And that’s Monday! BTW, the pattern has a super fun skirt as well, it would be great with boots and a short chunky sweater or jeans jacket.

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Bye for now! Coco

True Bias Yari Jumpsuit

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And I love it πŸ™‚ I wore jumpsuits a lot back in the 80’s – Β they were perfect for travel and for wearing on our farms in Costa Rica. The Yari takes me right back to that time, but it’s a lot easier to wash and wear than the vintage styles.

I was cautious with the pattern because of the design elements and the potential for fit failures. And I read every review I could find. Other folks’ experiences are so helpful, and, in this case, kind of saved my soup. Initially, I contemplated adding an inch or more to the bodice (I’m 5’7″, and Kelli drafts for a 5’5″ model). Many sewers did that exact thing, and they ended up with a too-low crotch seam. This one factor led to my muslin, which I sewed with no changes to the pattern (here).

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So cute!

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Some sewing notes:

  • My fabric is Kaufman yarn-dyed Essex linen in Espresso, purchased from Fabric.com. It’s 55%linen/45% cotton and weighs in at 5.6 oz/square yard. Great weight, body, and hand for this jumpsuit.

fabric

  • I started with View D, the long version with the extended shoulder. Once my shoulders were sewn, I trimmed and reshaped the armhole to suit me. The pattern has a sleeveless option, but I prefer a wider shoulder to balance the overall silhouette of the jumpsuit.

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  • I opted for a self-fabric belt with a D-ring buckle. I don’t care for a lot of fuss on my clothes, so I avoided side tabs, side ties, or a waist tie.
  • I also drafted my pattern with the wide-leg option offered by Kelli in her tutorial (here). It’s really easy, and it doesn’t add to the fabric requirement.

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Small details:

  • The finished shoulder, which is flat-felled on the right side, and a view of the bias binding on the armhole.

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  • The lower button band area closed with hand-stitching, instead of top-stitching.

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  • Inexpensive faux wood (or bone?) 5/8″ buttons from JoAnn. I used 6, spaced at 2 1/2″, being super careful not to have one under my belt buckle (more on buttons in an earlier post, here).

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To close, here’s a shot with no belt!

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Ciao! Coco

Buttons and buttonholes

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I’m working on my True Bias Yari jumpsuit, and this morning hit a critical point. Buttons!

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And buttonholes. I think the buttons are a focus for this pattern, and how well they work to purpose is critical. I decided to use 6 buttons, instead of 5. I never feel locked-in by button placements suggestions. What matters is how it works on me πŸ™‚

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After I decided on my button (which will be revealed with the post on the finished garment), I moved on to the buttonholes themselves.

I always put together a test piece, built exactly like the area in which I’ll put a buttonhole. Outside, interfacing, facing, edge-stitching, the whole ball of wax. For this garment, which I’m sewing in Essex linen, I decided on a rounded-end buttonhole, with a wider stitch (1) to add a little chunkiness (appearance) and (2) to protect the inherent loose weave of the linen (utility). At the same time, I tested the presser foot pressure (released for linen) and the upper thread tension (also released).

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When I first starting using my Juki HZL F600, I ignored the optional footplate of the buttonhole presser foot. No more! It really helps the fabric glide, any fabric, and is a terrific option.

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Last note on this: I never clip my threads on a buttonhole. Instead I take the front threads to the back and weave everything into the back buttonhole stitching. I just think loose, cut threads on the outside ruin a buttonhole. Finishing them only takes a little time.

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Next up: the jumpsuit! Hope everyone enjoys a lovely weekend, Coco