Sewing! Ready to Sew Justine Skirt

Actually, I’ve been sewing like crazy. It’s a great way to release tension and get off to never never land πŸ™‚

Check out this delightful skirt from Ready to Sew and, at the moment, it’s free. Grab it… Features: a layered PDF and half sizes, total 21 sizes. Remarkable!

Sewing notes:

  • I sewed the size 38, and it was perfect, including the width of the waistband.
  • My fabric is Kaufman Essex linen from Hancocks of Paducah. It’s a longtime favorite fabric for pants, jumpsuits, and skirts. It has just enough body with a relaxed drape – I wouldn’t do this skirt in anything really drapey, e.g., rayon challis, or too heavy, e.g., bottomweight twill.
  • Loves – the pockets. The decorative flap is so cute, and they are truly deep.
  • Be sure to catch the flap in the corner triangle. Got to keep it turned and flat…
  • The skirt has a one-button closure, but I was very wary of using a button closing. Have you ever had a button pull and pull, maybe tear the fabric to which it was sewn? I opted for two things: I added an additional piece of woven interfacing under the closure area,
  • and I used a waistband fastener for closure, with a non-functioning button on top!

About that top – it’s a Style Arc Elsie blouse, sleeveless, sewn in Kaufman Royal Cotton Oxford, from Fabric.com. What a delightful blouse fabric.

I love this and plan to wear it over and over as I search for a new house in Orlando. Easy dressing πŸ™‚ Coco

Style Arc Elsie camp shirt variation

Well, I never imagined I would like this play on a revere neckline, but I was so wrong! A thank you and shout-out to Karen (@intostitches) for the inspiration to try this pattern! It’s actually really interesting to sew and to wear.

From Style Arc, the real name of this cutie is the Elsie Oversized Shirt:

But with a few changes, it becomes a nifty semi-fitted shirt.

Basics:

  • Redrew the front and back hemlines and drafted a shirt-tail hem. My center back finishes at 25″, a favorite length.
  • Drafted a short-sleeve option.
  • Drafted the back with pleat or no-pleat options.

Other notes:

  • Sewed the size 10, and it’s a perfect fit.
  • Drafted my pattern with 1/2″ seam allowances, everywhere. The pattern includes 3/8″ and 1/4″ SAs, treacherous with woven fabrics!
  • Shortened the bust darts by an inch. For some reason they are drawn out past the bust apex mark. Weird.
  • Annoying (1) the pattern has full-width back and yoke pieces. I had to print the associated pages to get the goodies, but what a lot of wasted paper and ink, since both can be cut on the fold.
  • Annoying (2) it has a single-layer yoke! It’s easy enough to cut the facing, but what an oversight.

Bits and pieces:

I used cotton poplin shirting and Pellon sew-in interfacing, both from Fabric.com. And, yes, I washed and dried the interfacing before using it to avoid shrinkage when the entire garment is washed.

I like to attach pockets before things get going, whenever it’s practical.

The facing is sewn into the neckline and hand-stitched at the shoulders and bottom of the yoke.

It’s easy to reduce the bulk in a double-fold hem! My seams are serged together, stopping at a clip at the fold line. I open the remaining seam allowance, and it’s easy to make those folds.

I love rounded buttonholes on blouses πŸ™‚

A couple close-ups, worn out:

One is never enough – I’m starting a long-sleeve version tomorrow πŸ™‚

Ciao – Coco

Patricia Rose dress playtime

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More fun in the loft πŸ™‚ Having finished my draft of the Patricia Rose dress, and having sewn a muslin, it’s time to enjoy.

My muslin went to a new home. The color is all wrong for me, and I was really annoyed by my print placement. It happens!

close front

But I learned so much from this version. On to the next one, this time in a beautiful Ralph Lauren white/black stripe from Fabric Mart. It’s cotton/poly/elastane, described as suiting, but it’s very light, with just a bit of stretch both ways. It’s also opaque, and I have no issues with ‘see through’.

bb1

Sewing notes:

  • As before, I sewed the size 8, and I increased the neckline seam allowances from 1/4″ to 1/2″.
  • I also used my back and skirt variation, which has a fold to match the front fold (lots of info on the folds and skirt on my original post). I took these two pics outside, before our temp reached 91F. At which point I went inside!

IMG_1549 10.54.06 AM

IMG_1564 10.54.06 AM

  • My bananas print fabric was 46″ wide, this one is 53″ wide. I used 3 yards of both.
  • Playtime! I used an oversized pocket, centered on the side seam. The unfinished pocket is 11″ x 11 1/2″. After the top fold of 1 1/4″, Β it’s a bit wider than it is long.

pocket

  • Something I left out of my first post, I’m really happy with the seldom-seen armscye darts on the front bodice. I was afraid they would be pokey, but they’re perfect. Also shown, the solid white cotton/poly broadcloth facing, which prevents print shadows on the right side.

stripe bodice

Cute! I’m not done with this pattern πŸ™‚ It’s a wonderful palette for solids, stripes, large or abstract prints, and many substrates. I’m sewing summer now, and I cannot wear wool, but I think this would be beautiful- elegant – in a black wool woven or dupioni silk.

Or French terry – that middle ground between a woven and a knit.

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Ciao! Coco

Style Arc Patricia Rose dress variation

front

This project has been in thinking mode for a long time! When it first came out, I bought the Patricia Rose dress because I had pinned a really pretty dress with a front and back bodice fold. The Rose seemed a possible starting point for something similar.

top 2

My stash is pretty thin right now, but I did have a cute linen/cotton/rayon shirting I picked up on a whim from Fabric Mart. It’s called Traveling Bananas, by the mysterious Better Hawaiian Dress Manufacturer. Does anyone know who this is? Tori Richards maybe? Anyway, it’s a beautiful fabric, a pleasure to sew and wear.

back 2

My drafting process.

Of course I wanted my back bodice fold to match up with the front fold. So I used the front to draft the back.

back

bottom 1

Next, the skirt. I’m not fond of inverted pleats in skirts – they just don’t wear well. So I took some width out of the front skirt, leaving just enough width for soft gathers. Since the bottom widths of my front and back bodice are the same, I used the same draft for the back skirt!

skirt mods

A few more sewing notes:

  • I sewed the size 8, based on my bust measurement plus some ease.
  • The pattern has 1/2″ seam allowances everywhere except the neckline and facings, which are 1/4″. That is totally contra-intuitive given the risk of stretch and ravel on the neckline bias curves. I drew my tissue with 1/2″ SA everywhere, so much safer.

facing

  • I added 1″ to the length of the bodice, just above the area of the fold.
  • And added an additional 1 1/2″ to the length of the skirt.
  • My short sleeves are based on the original sleeve.
  • I used 1 3/4″ hem allowances on the sleeves and skirt, just to echo the bodice fold.
  • BTW, my fabric was 44″ wide by 3 yards. I had enough to cut pockets and long sleeves.

Pics!

I happened to take a snap of the front before I folded the bodice. It’s actually rather nice.

before fold

Closeups of those pretty folds:

close front

close back

close side

This project was so much fun that I was sorry to see it finished! Not really the end…I have a piece of striped fabric that has me back in the thinking mode.

Parting shot: David and Preston are in Beaver Creek, Colorado, for ski week. Preston is almost 10 and has been skiing for 3 years. Amazing, my little athlete, he actually does the expert slopes (moguls this year?) with his dad!

preston co

Bye for now – Coco

Style Arc Adeline Dress – Final Thoughts

line artAs I hinted in my post about the Style Arc Adeline Dress, I do have some lingering thoughts on the drafting and design –Β stride, and so on. Well, here we go.

Before I start, to all you Adeline lovers out there, please remember that this is my experience, and it’s totally based on me!

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I really did like my first version (post here) – but, this particular combo of greens is really becoming for me. I should use it more often.

My second version is in a lovely fabric by Tim Coffey, from his Poppy collection. I love poppies! so I was really happy to find this fabric at JoAnns.

My dress…

Not so much love. Take a look.

But it’s not for me. Not in the house, not to the grocery, just not anywhere.

Not to stray, and addressing my initial concerns, I did modify the pattern to add a little width at the bottom – the stride was a little tight. I added 1/2″ at the hemline seam, front and back, trued up to somewhere below the hip. This comes to a total addition of 2″ at the hem. And it is very helpful in walking and sitting. Of course I had to modify the hem facing bands as well. If you do this, I suggest drawing your new hem bands directly off your fabric. There are some bodacious curves and angles at play…

v4

So – I think I’ve laid this pattern to rest for myself, aside from perhaps raiding the neckline and hemline when I get rambunctious.

My fabric – green and blue – will be reused! I love them both.

Ciao! Coco