Olya Shirt and a little romance

c1

I was thinking of the line from Moonstruck the entire time I was sewing this. ‘Isn’t it romantic?’…

Actually, I purchased this rayon challis from Cali Fabrics at the same time I purchased the Paper Theory Olya Shirt pattern, with a soft blouse in mind.

collage pattern

I’m so glad I did a muslin (here), because I was able to draft my vision of the blouse based on that experience.

f0

b1

Lots of sewing notes:

  • As before I started with the size 8, and 1/2″ seam allowances. But I did not add to the length. I thought my muslin was a bit stuffy with the additional 2″.
  • The sleeve:
    • I added 1/2″ to the length and decided to add a little detail by splitting the lower sleeve and adding some topstitching.
    • Instead of a buttoned cuff, I used a 2″ wide band, using the same cuff pattern but sewn closed to width and attached.
    • I also gathered my sleeve into the band – no pleats.

s1

  • The neckline and collar:
    • Honestly, I felt strangled by the original collar – it’s very high and tight. Plus I thought it made my large head look huge!
    • I drafted a new front neckline, collar stand, and collar using the Named Saraste blouse pattern (my version here).
    • The collar is softer, larger, and about 1″ lower than the original pattern.
  • No pockets! To say they were shifty and difficult to attach is an understatement. I removed mine and simply closed the seam.

e1

  • Last little romantic change: I added 1″ to the width of the back skirt and gathered it into the yoke.

e2

  • Little things:

Sewing a curved hem can be a challenge at the side seam. I staystitched my hem at 3/4″, to provide a stable guide for the turn. And I released the side seam inside the hem to allow for a no-pucker finish. Alternatively, one could redraft the hem allowance to provide that extra bit.

collage hem

I’m crazy for nice finishing detail. A peek at how I attach a button – started on the right side, finished on the inside with the tail brought back up under the button and clipped. IMHO, sloppy button stitches on the inside of the placket are a tell.

collage buttons

An inspiration pic – I’m always cruising for ideas.

inspiration

And some styling – unbuttoned and simply open over a cami (imagine over a print spring dress).

unbuttoned.jpg]over shirt

Last thoughts…

Challis is a real beast challenge when sewn into structured details! It cannot be pressed without care, since it’s happy to shift and expand. Challis also has a huge amount of mechanical and bias stretch. No way would I use a fusible interfacing, because it puckers the challis and loses the original shape of the pattern piece. And, BTW, the adhesive on a fusible is likely to go through challis onto the plate of an iron. Aack! I cut my interfacing in a poly/cotton broadcloth and used it to interline the button plackets, collar stand, collar, and cuffs. I steam pressed the challis back into shape on the interlining pieces.

I launder all my fabrics before I use them, with serging on the cut ends of wovens. Rayon will shrink significantly, so a pre-wash will preclude disappointment in one’s garment.

I love this pattern. It’s complex and fun to sew. I’m really glad I did a muslin, because the resulting ‘muscle memory’ was very helpful in this version.┬áThe drafting and instructions are wonderful – this is a real winner from Paper Theory. I’ll make it again!

Bye for now – Coco

 

Paper Theory delightful Olya Shirt

buttoned

What an interesting and unique pattern! The drafting was so tempting, the most expensive pattern I’ve ever purchased, and it’s worth it. I worked on this for 5 days and enjoyed every minute!

collage pattern

I knew I would make a muslin, and I decided to use several fabrics to highlight the drafting and aid in any fitting I might want to do.

contrast

b2

I also used white thread everywhere, so I could see the construction more easily. In the end, I have a funky and fun shirt ­čÖé

Sewing notes:

  • I sewed the size 8, with 2″ added to the length of the bodice and front placket.
  • The pattern includes 1 cm seam allowances. No way. I drafted my tissue with 1/2″ SA’s.
  • The sleeve is much easier to sew than I anticipated. It was a little short for me, so I added 1/2″ in the cuff. Next version, I’ll just add to the length of the sleeve.

spread f

spread b

  • I used white broadcloth for my pocket bags to prevent print shadows. A tip: work with the pocket topstitching from the right side of the shirt, first marking two same-sized outlines. I guarantee the pocket bags will not be the same size if stitched from the inside.
  • Buttonholes – The inside of the top buttonholes will show when the collar is open, so they need to be pretty on both sides. A little┬ápractice on an interfaced remnant, with adjustments to the stitch width and length settings, is really helpful.

collage buttonholes

  • Collar angst…I used the pattern’s suggested construction technique and failed miserably (it finishes the collar stand/front placket area with a ‘burrito’ method). I took it apart and spent several hours making repairs (those 1/2″ seam allowances were much appreciated). Won’t do that again.
Screen Shot 2019-02-25 at 1.11.39 PM
From the instruction set.
  • A template for stitching the collar stand curve:

template

  • I’ve been playing with labels on the Dutch Labels website and made a small purchase so I can understand the fabric, size, options, and stitching. This is not the version I’ll order, but it’s a good test. I sewed it at the bottom of my front placket, since I cannot wear tags in my clothing. I like this!

label

Amazing pattern.

seat1

Ciao! Coco

McCall 7634 Sweatshirt in French terry

front 2

I’m so cold!! and have only a couple long sleeve tops. January and February are our chilly season, we went down to 43 degrees last night. Great excuse for a new top.

I started with M7634, followed with a few modifications, including the V-neck from Burda 06-2011-107B.

 

 

I love how this looks! the fabric is navy Telio Stewart French terry knit from Fabric.com, 38% cotton/32% polyester/30% rayon. It has about 25% mechanical stretch both ways, but no recovery at all.

back

Sewing notes:

  • Sewed the size 12 in the McCall pattern.
  • Used the short view with an additional 4.5″ in the length, and a 3″ (finished) bottom band. The unfinished band is about 7″ wide and a couple inches shorter than the bottom hem. Doubled and stretched it to fit.
  • Recut the neckline using the Burda pattern. It has facings, which I used to stabilize the neckline, in cotton/poly broadcloth. Yes, there is fusible tape in side the shoulder seams to prevent stretch.

facing

  • Stiches and finishes: I sewed the top using a longish (3.0) straight stitch and serged the seam allowances together to finish.
  • Finished the sleeve with a 1.5″ hem allowance plus a couple rows of topstitching.

closeup

It’s such a cozy and warm top, and I love the silhouette.

front 1

Parting shot: I was the woman out on the street in her robe last night, taking pictures of the lunar eclipse. Spectacular event! Moving clockwise from the top left photo:

tiles

Ciao! Coco

 

Blackwood and Ogden…

front 1

Small post…I made a couple favorites with fun variations. The cardigan is the Blackwood from Helen’s Closet, and the cami is my button front version of the True Bias Ogden Cami.

Fabrics: Cardigan, Pastel Rose Tan Poly/Rayon/Lycra Distressed French Terryt, and the Cami, Ashen Gray/White 100% Cotton Tweed Shirting by Halston. Both are from Fabric Mart.

Mostly pics, but earlier posts with details are here and here.

back

side

 

I used clear buttons on the cami, something less than 1/2″, from La Mode. The ‘weight’ really suits this shirting. I also put them only 2″ apart, 8 in all.

buttons

Recent sewing aspiration, I’m making a couple ‘Tom Selleck’ shirts for my son, as a prelude to a dress shirt. He wears Robert Graham shirts and asked if I can do something similar. What a compliment. Bye for now – Coco

 

True Bias Ogden Cami button front!

front closeup

I could not resist the opportunity to draft the True Bias Ogden Cami with a button front. Yes, I was inspired by the Style Arc Portia Top. Kind of irresistible. My woven muslin of the original pattern fit perfectly, but, IMHO, it lacked that little bit of detail that would make the pattern pop.

line art

BTW, below I’ve described my changes, but if it’s more comfortable for you, the Portia is a nice alternative.

style arc portia

So, my top. A couple pics on Emile, front and back. I didn’t mess with the back because it works so well for me – I have a broad back and the pattern gives me that extra ease.

This was so easy to do. I ordered some Ralph Lauren black cotton batiste from Fabric Mart specifically for this top. Batiste is a little lighter and more supple than lawn and a bit heavier than voile.

front

Sewing notes: I made changes to the front and the front lining.

  • Front first – I added 1/2″ at the center front for the button band overlap, and 1 1/2″ for the button band facing.

new facing

  • The lining – I added 1/2″ at the center front to match the front changes.

lining

  • And I cut fusible tricot lining for the new front button band, 1″ wide.

adding facing

  • Of course I practiced my buttonholes and stitches. I loosened the tension on my upper thread for straight stitching, but was OK with the buttonholes once I found the right size.

buttonhole practice

This top is so perfect with my cardigans. Off to the grocery…

off to the grocery

Winner! bye for now – Coco