True Bias Ogden Cami button front!

front closeup

I could not resist the opportunity to draft the True Bias Ogden Cami with a button front. Yes, I was inspired by the Style Arc Portia Top. Kind of irresistible. My woven muslin of the original pattern fit perfectly, but, IMHO, it lacked that little bit of detail that would make the pattern pop.

line art

BTW, below I’ve described my changes, but if it’s more comfortable for you, the Portia is a nice alternative.

style arc portia

So, my top. A couple pics on Emile, front and back. I didn’t mess with the back because it works so well for me – I have a broad back and the pattern gives me that extra ease.

This was so easy to do. I ordered some Ralph Lauren black cotton batiste from Fabric Mart specifically for this top. Batiste is a little lighter and more supple than lawn and a bit heavier than voile.

front

Sewing notes: I made changes to the front and the front lining.

  • Front first – I added 1/2″ at the center front for the button band overlap, and 1 1/2″ for the button band facing.

new facing

  • The lining – I added 1/2″ at the center front to match the front changes.

lining

  • And I cut fusible tricot lining for the new front button band, 1″ wide.

adding facing

  • Of course I practiced my buttonholes and stitches. I loosened the tension on my upper thread for straight stitching, but was OK with the buttonholes once I found the right size.

buttonhole practice

This top is so perfect with my cardigans. Off to the grocery…

off to the grocery

Winner! bye for now – Coco

True Bias Ogden Cami in knit fabric

knit front

First, please excuse my headless photos! I stayed up until 4 this morning watching season 4 of The Sopranos. And I did the same for the three previous nights, seasons 1 – 3. I don’t plan to stop this madness until I’ve watched them all. I have the complete series on DVD, but the display in live HD is much better.

BTW, I’m feeling a little self-conscious about my scleroderma in these pics. I know that’s unnecessary, but it still happens 🙂

OK, project! As have so many sewists, I recently purchased the True Bias Ogden Cami.

line art

What a great top. My first muslin was in cotton calico, size 4, and it’s a perfect fit. My only change was to lengthen it by 1″.

Of course I had to try it in knit fabric! My first version was also size 4, and the décolletage is low

first

But it was fun. Because I was leery of the lining crossing my bust, I lengthened it by 5″, and used it as an outside layer. And I used rolled seams. Cute!

Nonetheless, it was back to the drawing board. Sewing notes:

  • For my second knit version, I drafted the cami in size 2.
  • The fabric is white hacci knit from Fabric Mart. It’s too sheer for this top, but I had a remnant, good for a muslin.
  • I lengthened the front and back by 1″, as before,
  • And also lengthened the lining by 3″ so that I can use it on the inside without a line across my bust area.
  • To strengthen the straps, I trimmed the seam allowances to be just a little more narrow than the straps. I used a pin to turn them, because tube turners kept going through the fabric. To reduce stretch, I topstiched both edges at about 1/8″.

strap

Back view:

knit back

Next up will be a Paro Cardigan in a really funky distressed French Terry! It’s finished, but I’m thinking I’ll brush my hair before I take pics…

Bye for now – Coco

True Bias Nikko top – a muslin

f3

OK, please do not laugh at my pants or sleepy face! Focus, people! a small post about my muslin of the True Bias Nikko Top.

I discovered this pattern only a couple days ago, and I love it! Lots of options, and the selling point for me, a nice mock turtleneck.

line art

The pattern description suggests that the back on the sleeveless versions is somewhat similar to a racer back. I didn’t find that to be the case at all. It has nice coverage and a ‘traditional’ silhouette.  BTW, the pattern includes facings for the armhole, but I simply trimmed away 3/8″, and used self-fabric binding.

b2

Kelli suggests using knit fabrics with about 75% horizontal stretch. So of course I did my muslin with a remnant of cotton/lycra jersey, only 40% stretch. Well, I could not begin to pull the turtleneck section over my head 🙂 I modified it to be somewhat wider, just enough to pull over my oversize noggin. In the future I will pay attention to the stretch factor!

f2

Cute, right? Has anyone else sewn this?

I’m off to find stretchy fabric (the sleeveless top requires only 1.3 yards in my size 10).

Bye for now – Coco

Monday muslin V8499 pants

V8499

Sometimes I just want to take another look at a pattern. I first made the V8499 pants when I was much heavier, and I was trying Lagenlook styles. Thinking about it over the weekend, and having a couple yards of available Brussels washer linen, I decided to try a smaller size. So a Monday muslin 🙂

First version:

f11.jpg

Honestly, I don’t care for this style at the moment. But these pants are not wasted – they’ll be reworked as a straight leg pant. I would really like them in a corduroy for our brief winter. And those pockets are simply too good to ignore.

Undeterred, I’m about to cut out a True Bias Yari jumpsuit in Kaufman Essex linen, yard-dyed denim. I’ve enjoyed my espresso version so much.

And that’s Monday! BTW, the pattern has a super fun skirt as well, it would be great with boots and a short chunky sweater or jeans jacket.

line art.jpg

Bye for now! Coco

True Bias Yari Jumpsuit

b1

And I love it 🙂 I wore jumpsuits a lot back in the 80’s –  they were perfect for travel and for wearing on our farms in Costa Rica. The Yari takes me right back to that time, but it’s a lot easier to wash and wear than the vintage styles.

I was cautious with the pattern because of the design elements and the potential for fit failures. And I read every review I could find. Other folks’ experiences are so helpful, and, in this case, kind of saved my soup. Initially, I contemplated adding an inch or more to the bodice (I’m 5’7″, and Kelli drafts for a 5’5″ model). Many sewers did that exact thing, and they ended up with a too-low crotch seam. This one factor led to my muslin, which I sewed with no changes to the pattern (here).

y3

So cute!

b4

Some sewing notes:

  • My fabric is Kaufman yarn-dyed Essex linen in Espresso, purchased from Fabric.com. It’s 55%linen/45% cotton and weighs in at 5.6 oz/square yard. Great weight, body, and hand for this jumpsuit.

fabric

  • I started with View D, the long version with the extended shoulder. Once my shoulders were sewn, I trimmed and reshaped the armhole to suit me. The pattern has a sleeveless option, but I prefer a wider shoulder to balance the overall silhouette of the jumpsuit.

b3

  • I opted for a self-fabric belt with a D-ring buckle. I don’t care for a lot of fuss on my clothes, so I avoided side tabs, side ties, or a waist tie.
  • I also drafted my pattern with the wide-leg option offered by Kelli in her tutorial (here). It’s really easy, and it doesn’t add to the fabric requirement.

b2

Small details:

  • The finished shoulder, which is flat-felled on the right side, and a view of the bias binding on the armhole.

binding and shoulder

  • The lower button band area closed with hand-stitching, instead of top-stitching.

hand stitch

  • Inexpensive faux wood (or bone?) 5/8″ buttons from JoAnn. I used 6, spaced at 2 1/2″, being super careful not to have one under my belt buckle (more on buttons in an earlier post, here).

button.jpg

To close, here’s a shot with no belt!

no belt

Ciao! Coco